SAVE AFRICA'S PRIMATES

BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE
DONATE

PASA members have been severely affected by the Coronavirus crisis. Click here to see how the Alliance is protecting primates from COVID-19.

Help us save endangered species like chimpanzees, gorillas, bonobos, and monkeys. PASA is the largest association of wildlife centers in Africa, with 23 members in 13 countries. Together, we’re securing a future for Africa’s primates. 

PASA is among the highest rated animal charities. We have a Platinum rating from Guidestar and are Top Rated by Great Nonprofits. Over 83% of donations go directly to programs in Africa, so our members can rescue apes and monkeys from the illegal wildlife trade and provide lifetime care. 

Celebrating 20 years of rescuing endangered apes and monkeys!

For 20 years, PASA has been racing against time to save endangered primate species. Over the past 20 years, the alliance has saved the lives of thousands of animals, but sanctuaries in Africa are facing difficult times while on lockdown due to the global coronavirus pandemic. To survive another 20 years, apes and monkeys need YOU to donate.

Facebook Posts

Enrichment is incredibly important to the primates in rehabilitation centers and sanctuaries. One of the main areas that caregivers use enrichment is in feeding time.

In the Limbe Wildlife Centre, this Agile Mangabey had his peanut treats hidden around his enclosure under wooden shavings. In the wild, these primates would spend a large part of their day foraging for food. By hiding food around the enclosure, the primates have to search as they would in the wild.

🎥 Limbe Wildlife Centre
fb.watch/44Tjwr51s_/

Limbe Wildlife Centre
We hope you've been enjoying your day as much as Agile mangabey (cercocebus agilis) Mr Limbe Camp is enjoying his new enrichment! 🍂 Here, his enclosure floor has been covered in wood shavings with little peanut treats hidden inside. This type of enrichment stimulates their natural behaviors of foraging and looking for food, while also entertaining and providing them with nutritious snacks. 🥜
... See MoreSee Less

Chimpanzees naturally work out their hierarchy by using their strength to show their dominance. They also use relationships with other chimps in their group to build support in case they need it. 

At Chimpanzee Conservation Center, the juveniles are already practicing these methods to push their way up the hierarchy. Soumba is being a bit of a bully to Nana, mostly because Soumba is currently the largest in their group. Nana has been trying to use her friendship with Oumou to gain support, but Oumou prefers to stay neutral. It may seem like unfair playground bullying, but these learned behaviours will be vital for these chimps future success.

📸 Chimpanzee Conservation CenterImage attachmentImage attachment

Chimpanzees naturally work out their hierarchy by using their strength to show their dominance. They also use relationships with other chimps in their group to build support in case they need it.

At Chimpanzee Conservation Center, the juveniles are already practicing these methods to push their way up the hierarchy. Soumba is being a bit of a bully to Nana, mostly because Soumba is currently the largest in their group. Nana has been trying to use her friendship with Oumou to gain support, but Oumou prefers to stay neutral. It may seem like unfair playground bullying, but these learned behaviours will be vital for these chimps' future success.

📸 Chimpanzee Conservation Center
... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Hermoso. Seee

Sometimes you just can’t reach the right spot! 🙈

When Jenny couldn’t quite manage to reach an itch at the top of her back, she decided to find herself a forest backscratcher! 💚

📸: Ape Action Africa / Jo Gaweda
... See MoreSee Less

Load more

Facebook Posts

Enrichment is incredibly important to the primates in rehabilitation centers and sanctuaries. One of the main areas that caregivers use enrichment is in feeding time.

In the Limbe Wildlife Centre, this Agile Mangabey had his peanut treats hidden around his enclosure under wooden shavings. In the wild, these primates would spend a large part of their day foraging for food. By hiding food around the enclosure, the primates have to search as they would in the wild.

🎥 Limbe Wildlife Centre
fb.watch/44Tjwr51s_/

Limbe Wildlife Centre
We hope you've been enjoying your day as much as Agile mangabey (cercocebus agilis) Mr Limbe Camp is enjoying his new enrichment! 🍂 Here, his enclosure floor has been covered in wood shavings with little peanut treats hidden inside. This type of enrichment stimulates their natural behaviors of foraging and looking for food, while also entertaining and providing them with nutritious snacks. 🥜
... See MoreSee Less

Chimpanzees naturally work out their hierarchy by using their strength to show their dominance. They also use relationships with other chimps in their group to build support in case they need it. 

At Chimpanzee Conservation Center, the juveniles are already practicing these methods to push their way up the hierarchy. Soumba is being a bit of a bully to Nana, mostly because Soumba is currently the largest in their group. Nana has been trying to use her friendship with Oumou to gain support, but Oumou prefers to stay neutral. It may seem like unfair playground bullying, but these learned behaviours will be vital for these chimps future success.

📸 Chimpanzee Conservation CenterImage attachmentImage attachment

Chimpanzees naturally work out their hierarchy by using their strength to show their dominance. They also use relationships with other chimps in their group to build support in case they need it.

At Chimpanzee Conservation Center, the juveniles are already practicing these methods to push their way up the hierarchy. Soumba is being a bit of a bully to Nana, mostly because Soumba is currently the largest in their group. Nana has been trying to use her friendship with Oumou to gain support, but Oumou prefers to stay neutral. It may seem like unfair playground bullying, but these learned behaviours will be vital for these chimps' future success.

📸 Chimpanzee Conservation Center
... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Hermoso. Seee

Sometimes you just can’t reach the right spot! 🙈

When Jenny couldn’t quite manage to reach an itch at the top of her back, she decided to find herself a forest backscratcher! 💚

📸: Ape Action Africa / Jo Gaweda
... See MoreSee Less

Load more